STUDIUM/punctum Press

Tim and Annie make zines both together and separately under the name STUDIUM/punctum Press. They write about film, food, radical politics, books, art, the internet, and more, and usually combine heavily researched nerdiness with personal reflection, humor, and visual art. They also distro zines from friends and comrades from around the country.

City:North Hollywood
  • Poetry/Literary
  • Photography
  • Political/Social
  • Cultural
  • Perzine
  • Music/Art

Logo/Graphic
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  • Please upload up 2-5 additional images.
  • Please upload up 2-5 additional images.
  • Please upload up 2-5 additional images.

What are your current zines about?

We write about film, food, radical politics, books, art, the internet, and more, and usually combine heavily researched nerdiness with personal reflection, humor, and visual art.

What methods do you use to make your zine?

  • Handwritten/drawn
  • Cut-and-paste
  • Photocopying
  • Digital

What type of binding do you use for your zine(s)?

  • Stapled
  • Other

What does the future of zines and independent publishing look like to you?

Annie: It's exciting to me to constantly see new faces at zine fests and the multitude of creative publishing that exists right now is incredibly inspiring. While in a number of ways I think the zine community is expanding and becoming more and more inclusive, I would really hope to see a continuation of that into the future of self-publishing. It's a dream of mine for there to be similar classes for elderly communities. I want octogenarian perzines to become the Next Big Thing.

Tim: I think what's most interesting to me is the way that zines provide a place for different communities and approaches to mingle and overlap. Going to fests it's fun to see comics and perzines and agitprop political zines and fanzines and poetry and artist's books and whatever else all together in the same space. My hope is that those communities cross-pollinate more and draw inspiration from each other.

What was your first zine called? What was it about?

Annie: I first learned about zines when I was 12 and a student at the Rock & Roll Camp for Girls in Portland, Oregon. We had a workshop where we talked about media and why its important for girls, young people, et al to take media into their own hands and create their own form of representation. Each student made a page (which could be about literally anything you wanted) and all of them were combined into a ~75 page black & white photocopied zine that each of us got to take home at the end of the week. The title of my page was "Dig or Diss?" and it was a bunch of little lists and quips about the things I was really into and those that I hated as a goofy and dorky eighth grader. I'm looking at my page right now, and apparently I had very averse feelings about the 2002 film "Crossroads" starring Britney Spears, and loved "2001: A Space Odyssey, of which I wrote, "If I was a monkey, I'd be scared, too."

Tim: I was about 16 when two friends of mine I had been taking a writing workshop with asked me to collaborate on a zine with them. The idea was to collect art and writing from fellow teens in our suburban county. We titled it "Off-Kilter." At the time I thought I wanted to be a graphic designer, and I convinced my collaborators that instead of the time-honored cut-and-paste photocopy style, they should let me do all the layouts digitally and print it at full 8.5x11" size, stapled down the side. It looked more like a book report than a zine. I was so not punk!

What is your biggest challenge in making zines?

Annie: Before moving here, I worked part-time, so I had enough hours in the day to dedicate to writing, drawing, and thinking, but I felt like I didn't have enough money to fully realize the projects I dreamt up. Now I have a pretty routine 9-to-5 job so while I am less concerned with how to fund my projects, the precious free time I have feels crammed with so many other non-zine things. I have a tendency to snowball my ideas into these really grandiose, almost unachievable projects that only ever live in my head. I will also impose a lot of rules and restrictions on myself in how I work, which is not always a great approach. I think that it is a challenge to allow myself to make things on a much smaller scale, and give myself room for imperfection.

Tim: Oh yeah, the snowballing, perfectionist thing for sure. A lot of times I'll have an idea for a zine and then once I start outlining and working on it it's like "wow, actually, that's not a zine, that's a book!" and I either have to scale it back or put it on the back burner or just pick one part of the idea to do. I also always struggle with setting prices for our work. I always want things to be as affordable as possible, but if we want to be able to keep making new work we can't be losing money all the time. And there's always the temptation of wanting to shell out for the color cover or the really nice vellum or embossing or die cutting or some other nifty print nerd thing which probably isn't really necessary.