See/d

We are womxn of color whose zynez focus on : Mental health, self care, community building, holistic & alternative healing.
We share this content through photography, illustration, perzines, poetry/prose, and DIY resources. As a collective, we are working on creating collaborative printed materials published with the input of our communities.

City:Long Beach
  • Poetry/Literary
  • Photography
  • Political/Social
  • Perzine
  • Illustration
  • DIY/Instructional
  • Other (please describe)

Logo/Graphic

What are your current zines about?

See/d Paper (community created newspaper), Community Cook & Conversation events, Menstrual Cycle Journal, resource oriented guides, howto's, recipe zines, self care, mental health, and healing through art & expression

What methods do you use to make your zine?

  • Handwritten/drawn
  • Cut-and-paste
  • Photocopying
  • Screenprinting
  • Digital

What type of binding do you use for your zine(s)?

  • Folded
  • Stapled
  • Saddlestitched
  • Hand-stitched

When did you start making zines ... and why?

Individually we have been making zines for a few years, but just recently as a collective. We met through the zine community and decided to come together to create: See/d
Through zines, self published materials, and community events, we aim to build & share together.

How do you create your zine content?

Elise Bernal
My zines are focused on notes and reminders that are gathered from the wisdom of other people, from experiences, from moments of learning in mindfulness, and supportive resources.

Ellen Bae
Sketchbook pages, open calls + collabs, -- Observation and introspection, interpersonal relationships, femininity, cultural identities, community, non sequiturs, illustration & comics.

Jess Castillo
Public transit; diaspora; understanding decolonial foodways; and photo zines on gentrification, and documentations of LA and other places.

Sam Viloria
My zines set out to explore, normalize, and support others through feelings of sadness, anxiety, disappointment, and trauma through the use of illustrated characters called grumpy grls.

Why do you think independent publishing is important?

It comes back to story and who is telling it, what is being told, and how that story carries on over time. We need each other now, we needed each other back then and we sure as shit will need each other moving forward. Zines can be a way of holding onto each other like that.

What does the future of zines and independent publishing look like to you?

I see it being stronger as a result of this web megaworld. Downloadable zines. Virtual zine libraries and archives. Borderless zines. Multi-everything zines. Zines in code. These already exist in many ways and I see / hope it will continue to grow in this direction. Also, way more workshops.

What is your favorite part of making zines?

Sharing them. Connecting as a result of sharing them. Creating friendships and communities that support each other’s ideas and words and images.

What is your biggest challenge in making zines?

Most times it’s confidence, trust in my own practice. Believing that the zines deserve to be made. That’s why I mentioned it earlier as advice because doubt really can stop so many necessary actions from happening. I’ve learned a lot through zine making, about process, community building, craft, and vulnerability especially. Making in that true space, being there for yourself and all the ideas you want to manifest is serious shit. It’s also a lot of fun. Constantly figuring out “okay, how is this going to work? I’m broke and my anxiety is coming in unannounced and I haven’t been eating right but this zine wants to be made” and if you’re committed to it somewhere inside inside, that zine will come into being.

What else do you want people know about you or your zines?

We invite people to contribute so we can converse and grow together.

Logo/Graphic
  • Please upload up 2-5 additional images.
  • Please upload up 2-5 additional images.

What are your current zines about?

See/d Paper (community created newspaper), Community Cook & Conversation events, Menstrual Cycle Journal, resource oriented guides, howto's, recipe zines, self care, mental health, and healing through art & expression

What methods do you use to make your zine?

  • Handwritten/drawn
  • Cut-and-paste
  • Photocopying
  • Screenprinting
  • Digital

What type of binding do you use for your zine(s)?

  • Folded
  • Stapled
  • Saddlestitched
  • Hand-stitched

When did you start making zines ... and why?

Individually we have been making zines for a few years, but just recently as a collective. We met through the zine community and decided to come together to create: See/d
Through zines, self published materials, and community events, we aim to build & share together.

How do you create your zine content?

Elise Bernal
My zines are focused on notes and reminders that are gathered from the wisdom of other people, from experiences, from moments of learning in mindfulness, and supportive resources.

Ellen Bae
Sketchbook pages, open calls + collabs, -- Observation and introspection, interpersonal relationships, femininity, cultural identities, community, non sequiturs, illustration & comics.

Jess Castillo
Public transit; diaspora; understanding decolonial foodways; and photo zines on gentrification, and documentations of LA and other places.

Sam Viloria
My zines set out to explore, normalize, and support others through feelings of sadness, anxiety, disappointment, and trauma through the use of illustrated characters called grumpy grls.

Why do you think independent publishing is important?

It comes back to story and who is telling it, what is being told, and how that story carries on over time. We need each other now, we needed each other back then and we sure as shit will need each other moving forward. Zines can be a way of holding onto each other like that.

What does the future of zines and independent publishing look like to you?

I see it being stronger as a result of this web megaworld. Downloadable zines. Virtual zine libraries and archives. Borderless zines. Multi-everything zines. Zines in code. These already exist in many ways and I see / hope it will continue to grow in this direction. Also, way more workshops.

What is your favorite part of making zines?

Sharing them. Connecting as a result of sharing them. Creating friendships and communities that support each other’s ideas and words and images.

What is your biggest challenge in making zines?

Most times it’s confidence, trust in my own practice. Believing that the zines deserve to be made. That’s why I mentioned it earlier as advice because doubt really can stop so many necessary actions from happening. I’ve learned a lot through zine making, about process, community building, craft, and vulnerability especially. Making in that true space, being there for yourself and all the ideas you want to manifest is serious shit. It’s also a lot of fun. Constantly figuring out “okay, how is this going to work? I’m broke and my anxiety is coming in unannounced and I haven’t been eating right but this zine wants to be made” and if you’re committed to it somewhere inside inside, that zine will come into being.

What else do you want people know about you or your zines?

We invite people to contribute so we can converse and grow together.