Sean Andress

My zines reproduce my original ink drawings along with my hand-made analog collages. I also have a zine of poetry.

City:Riverside
  • Poetry/Literary
  • Illustration

Logo/Graphic
  • Please upload up 2-5 additional images.
  • Please upload up 2-5 additional images.
  • Please upload up 2-5 additional images.

What are your current zines about?

My zines collect my original ink drawings and analog collages. The images are surreal and absurd. Each zine offers a different experience for the viewer depending on what is being conveyed. One zine could be a bit disturbing, while another might be more emotional and raw.

What methods do you use to make your zine?

  • Handwritten/drawn
  • Cut-and-paste
  • Photocopying

What type of binding do you use for your zine(s)?

  • Folded
  • Stapled
  • Saddlestitched

When did you start making zines ... and why?

I started making zines around the year 2001. I was interested in creating an affordable product that I could share with others. There is an incredible amount of freedom in self-publishing. Zines are the perfect medium for this type of expression.

How do you create your zine content?

I first create the art by hand. If it's a drawing, I simply use a cheap brush and black India ink. If it's a collage I collect magazines and rip out images that strike me as impactful and glue them onto paper. Once the art is complete, I scan it into the computer and print out a copy which I xerox or have an outside printing company do the work in creating the final zine.

Why do you think independent publishing is important?

Independent publishing is important because it allows the content to be conveyed in all its purity directly from the creator. There are no limits to what one can self-publish. It's total freedom.

What does the future of zines and independent publishing look like to you?

Hopefully zines will still be created by hand and printed on paper instead of going completely digital much like novels or magazines. There's an intimacy and pleasure in holding a physical object that's inherent and vital to the experience.

What was your first zine called? What was it about?

My first zine was created around 2001 and was called "Underneath the Skin". It was, in retrospect, a very crude collection of short comic book stories that makes me cringe just thinking about it. The art was beyond terrible and thankfully no one but maybe two people bought it.

What is your favorite part of making zines?

I enjoy the entire process. But I think creating the actual content is the most fulfilling. Then creating the visual flow of the book comes next. Finally, it's always nice to get the physical object into the hands of a stranger who connects with it on some level.

What is your biggest challenge in making zines?

Self-doubt. I try to publish my best work with each new zine. That can be a struggle. It's a challenge to not repeat one's self. I try to push myself to create something new and different with every new project. But I am my worst critic and always look back and think, "I could've done that zine better".

What else do you want people know about you or your zines?

Zines are a wonderful artistic medium with limitless possibilities. I continue to explore what the medium can do. I hope someone feels some sort of strong emotion when they pick up my zines. Anything beyond that is icing on the cake.