Logo/Graphic

I create comics that focus on empathy and the most important relationships between people. Much of my work is made for young adults and kids, with the intention that people of all ages might find something to relate to. I also strive to reflect my own personal background by including content that reflects who I am and where I grew up. Stylistically, my artwork is playful, colorful, and heavily influenced by my love of manga and independent comics.

Website:http://www.amberpadilla.com

Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/candymistakes

Twitter:https://www.twitter.com/candymistakes

Other social media:https://www.facebook.com/candymistakes

  • Please upload 2-5 images of your work.
  • Please upload 2-5 images of your work.
  • Please upload 2-5 images of your work.
What methods do you use to make your zine?
  • Handwritten/drawn
  • Digital
What type of binding do you use for your zine(s)?
  • Folded
  • Stapled
When did you start making zines ... and why?

I started making zines and mini-comics in 2015 as a way to share the first comic I’d ever completed from beginning middle and end. Since it was only seven pages long, a zine format made the most sense for it. The idea that there was no need for a major publisher to get your work out there in printed format was really appealing to me. And the printed part is key, I love to consume content in print, from novels to comics, and of course zines, I love holding the paper product, flipping through pages and resting everything on my bookshelves.

What is your favorite part of making zines?

I think my favorite part in making zines is that final moment in the construction process. There’s nothing like taking a bone folder over the paper and adding staples to the binding. Suddenly all the pieces come together and in your hands is a real thing. It really is magical.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to start making zines?

Don’t be afraid to just make something. It doesn’t need to be perfect. The zine scape is one of the few places that is truly forgiving when it comes to a final product. I’ve found that some of my favorite zines are not always the slickest ones. While I do think improving your practice over time is a sign of personal growth, you do have to start somewhere, so JUST START! Your idea might just be the thing that someone else out there needs to see.